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Random Pics Of Old China

ralphrepo

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This image was found on the University Of Southern California Library's Internet Mission Photography Archives. Again, the christian missionary incursions into China was a double edged sword. They brought clear and convincing evidence to the Chinese people of how backwards China had become, and fostered a yearning for modernization and reform. However, the missionaries also brought a sense of subordination and oppression, as Chinese lands and territory were ceded to foreign political interests. Often many Chinese viewed the evangelical and political works of the foreigners to be one and the same, that it was there to subjugate the Chinese people. Aside from their social and political impact, it is clear that by their historic presence, whether one feels it was for ill or for good, they provided a vital visual record of their time there. Their recorded images continue to be an endless visual trove of old China.
The Internet Mission Photography Archive offers historical images from Protestant and Catholic missionary collections in Britain, Norway, Germany, and the United States. The photographs, which range in time from the middle of the nineteenth to the middle of the twentieth century, offer a visual record of missionary activities and experiences in Africa, China, Madagascar, India, Papua-New Guinea, and the Caribbean. The photographs reveal the physical influence of missions, visible in mission compounds, churches, and school buildings, as well as the cultural impact of mission teaching, religious practices, and Western technology and fashions. Indigenous peoples' responses to missions and the emergence of indigenous churches are represented, as are views of landscapes, cities, and towns before and in the early stages of modern development.

Source: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/impa/controller/index.htm

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x73/ralphrepo/PopularAsians/IMP-SOA-CWM-15-10-079-020edit007Fli.jpg

Entitled: Portrait Of Manchu Girl In Traditional Costume, Beijing, China, [c1861-1864] Attribution Unk [RESTORED] I did simple spot removal and then had to do a lot of edge damage repair and reconstruction. The bottom right corner was evident of very bad retouching work on the original, as it looked like the corner was either water damaged or unevenly developed. The bottom left corner was missing and appeared to have suffered fire damage. After the repairs, contrast and tonal adjustments, Sepia toned and then a faux Duotone of Blue and Yellow.

According to the information listed about this image:
"Young girl in full dress - a Manchu; [Manchu Girl in full dress]"; Portrait of seated girl with fan. One of a set of prints by an unidentified Russian photographer, bearing caption in English and also captions in Russian on the reverse. They are also accompanied by a hand written list of captions, and where this differs from the caption written on the print, this has been included in square brackets above.

William Lockhart was among the pioneers of medical missionary work for the LMS. He travelled to Canton [now Guangzhou] in 1838, opening hospitals at Macao [now Macau] and Shanghai before opening a mission in Peking [now Beijing] in 1861. Lockhart left Beijing in 1864, although remained connected with the Society, serving as Chairman of the Board of Directors in 1869. Lockhart obtained these prints during his time in Beijing, and they came into the LMS collection from Constance Patterson [née Brown] who had been given them by Lockhart's daughter, Mrs. Jervis.

It is listed under Record ID: impa-m1565

Source: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/impa/controller/view/impa-m1565.html?x=1260886813833
 

ralphrepo

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Every overseas Chinese family has roots somewhere in China. My own were from Hong Kong, in particular North Point. Grandpa was the owner of a tin container manufacturing plant that made everything from biscuit tins to serving trays, and I remember living in a big house on the hill overlooking the city.

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x73/ralphrepo/PopularAsians/scan0015edit003sm.jpg


Entitled: Mom & Me, Grandpa's house, North Point, Hong Kong, China [1958] Attribution Unk [RESTORED] I did light spot removal, contrast and tonal adjustments, with a sepia and faux Duotone. I had scanned the 3 x 3 inch original at 1200 DPI, then reduced it to 25% for posting.

Gosh, I really miss those days!

Found a box of old family pictures that I had been meaning to scan for years. Finally getting around to doing it, and I just had to do this one first. It's a pic of me sitting on my mother's lap, enjoying the sunshine somewhere on my Grandpa's estate. I have a special weakness for the Hong Kong 50's era and now I finally understand why. At the time, I had lived in the lap of luxury with maids and attendants. After moving to the US everything sorta went downhill from there <Sigh>
 

ralphrepo

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It's been a long time since I've posted any restored pics. Suddenly had some time so here's a new one that I found from one of my long time favorites, John Thomson:


Entitled: Title Unk, Photograph of houses in front of river with boats, China [c1869] John Thomson [RESTORED]. I did spot duty, along with a very slight counter clock rotation to level the horizon, then repaired and or reconstructed the edges. Thereafter, contrast was boosted, a false duo-tone added and I simply whited out a very dismal looking gray sky.

For those who like to collect pics off the internet of old China, the ones found in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art are great. All the pics from the Met are high res and downloadable, not like some other museums who only show you crappy thumbnails which had been further marred by some stupid corporate logo.
 

ralphrepo

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More John Thompson from the Metropolitan Museum of Art:



Entitled: Title Unknown, Photograph of rocky shoreline with lone man on beach and boats in distance, China [c1871] John Thomson [RESTORED] I did spot duty, approx 2 degree counter clock rotation, then repaired and or reconstructed the edges. I added a false cloud strewn sky to replace the dismal overcast in the original, then added a false reflection of the clouds in the water. Contrast was increased, then a sepia and a mild false duotone was included. Finally an artificial graininess was added overall.

 
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